Ending the Week with Charred Goosebeak

Colgate%E2%80%99s+improv+comedy+group%2C+Charred+Goosebeak%2C+took+to+the+stage+on+January+31+for+their+first+show+of+the+semester.

Colgate’s improv comedy group, Charred Goosebeak, took to the stage on January 31 for their first show of the semester.

Abby Blair, Maroon-News Staff

A business proposal: a massage parlor where not only is the client naked, but the masseuse is too? According to the audience at the Charred Goosebeak show on January 31, while it may not be the most practical business plan, it was absurdly funny to imagine.

Charred Goosebeak, a student improv comedy group on campus, once again filled the basement of the Creative Arts House with roars of laughter with their quick wit and exuberant stage presence. The group kicked off the show with a game called “Innuendo.” To start the game, they asked the audience to name a thing, and the entire crew took it from there with the template: “I like my men how I like my…” One prompt from the audience was “golf clubs,” which generated zany responses such as, “I like my men how I like my golf clubs: locked in the trunk of my car,” from sophomore Henry Claudy.

Another well-liked skit called “Shift Left” came in the middle of the show. In this skit, four members act out four different skits through a series of rotations. Every time an off-stage member says “shift left,” the members rotate so that one skit is being performed at a time, and when they come full circle, that skit picks up right where it left off. It’s a fast-paced game that still gives the members time to cook up some grade-A material while another skit has the audience’s attention.

This skit is senior Mary Clubb’s personal favorite.

“I thought ‘Shift Left’ was hilarious; I’m a big fan of it. I also thought the audience responded great. There’s just so much talent in one small basement,” Clubb said.

Right after “Shift Left” came “Ding-Dong.” This skit almost always gets a boisterous response from the audience, and last week’s show was no exception. The off-stage command, “ding,” instructs the person who just spoke on stage to change what they just said. “Dong” means that they have to change the accent they’re speaking in.

This time, the game started with the two members speaking in American accents about a man coming in for a massage and ended with the members talking about a business plan where they show up naked at people’s houses and offer them massages in Swedish and French accents. Senior George Karamanoukian and sophomore Griffin Fenady were the two performers for this wacky skit, and they are known for their spot-on accents used in, as well as often outside of, the shows.

This skit made a great impression on junior Ayah Elarabi.

“I really enjoyed [the show]—I thought they were really funny. I think George and Griffin were amazing in ‘Ding-Dong,’” Elarabi said. Finally, to wrap up the show, the whole group got on stage and took prompts from the audience for a series of mini-skits to wrap up the performance. Charred Goosebeak is a fantastic example of some of the creative activities happening around Colgate—they have multiple shows a semester, so keep an eye out on Facebook and Instagram for the date and time of their next show, and come with things, places and relationships in mind so you can suggest prompts.

To see more updates on the comedy group, follow Charred Goosebeak on Instagram @goosebeak.

Contact Abby Blair at [email protected]