In The Light: Rohan Chaudhari

Rohan+Chaudhari

Rohan Chaudhari

Ignacio Villar, Maroon-News Staff

Rohan Chaudhari’s journey to Colgate was a happy accident. Initially not knowing what he wanted to study, Chaudhari’s high school encouraged him to look into liberal arts colleges.

“My high school encourages kids to look at schools around the world depending on what they want to study. I had no idea, so they said I could take my shot with a scholarship and apply to liberal arts colleges. I looked into schools around the northeast be- cause I have family near here and stumbled upon Colgate,” Chaudhari said.

Having grown up in Calcutta, India, senior Rohan Chaudhari was not accustomed to Colgate’s way of defining life through work.

“Everything is fast paced and pre- professional here. Work here is something that you define yourself with, for better or for worse. Back home, a dream job is an oxymoron. Work is just a means to an end and the end is everything you do outside of work,” Chaudhari said. “That is something that I still find interesting and something that rattles me every once in a while.”

However, Chaudhari’s indecision didn’t last long at Colgate.

“I chose computer science to concentrate in my first semester because I took Introduction to Computer Science, and I loved it. I found philosophy my sophomore year, and I loved that as well. Professor David Dudrick has had the largest impact on me here at Colgate. I think, on some level, I want to be like him when I grow up,” Chaudhari said.

Chaudhari’s favorite memories at Colgate are more about people than events.

“A couple of friends and I have this ritual, where on the last day of school before breaks, after tests are done, we go up to the ‘Field of Dreams’ or Darwin Path just to walk around and listen to music. We catch up and look at how we were at the beginning of the semester and how we are now,” Chaudhari said.

Involved in programs such as Link Staff, Outdoor Education and Brothers, Chaudhari has some advice for first-years.

“I think branching out a lot, through clubs or academic classes, is a good idea be- cause once you actually get to know people beyond just the surface, and you actually scratch below the surface, you have a better idea of what people are like and who you actually want to spend time with. And I think that’s healthy for the next three years you have here,” Chaudhari said.

Contact Ignacio Villar at [email protected]